Kelly

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  • Birthday June 22

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    http://www.projectjason.org
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    Renton WA

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  1. Hello Kelly,

    this is christina Weinhammer.  My brother, Steven is missing again.  I tried to send in the missing sheet, however the put in dates for birthday and missing date do not work there for it won't let me send the form in. Can you help?

    thank you, Christina 

  2. http://whmi.com/news/article/27718 Saturday Marks 8 Year Anniversary Of Fenton Woman's Mysterious Disappearance February 10, 2017 While the strange disappearance of a Fenton woman eight years ago is technically a cold case, police and family members are holding onto hope. Then 42-year-old Randa Jawhari vanished from her apartment complex on Shiawassee Avenue near US-23 on February 11th, 2009. Police were left with no signs of foul play or other clues as to where she may have gone. Randa, who had been diagnosed with mental illness, didn’t own a car, driver’s license or credit card. Fenton Police Chief Rick Aro tells WHMI his update is very similar to last year unfortunately but they continue to look at everything and follow up on every lead received. He says these cold cases can be very frustrating because they would like to get some closure for the family and find out what happened but there are some small pieces of information they need to make that happen and they just haven’t found them yet. While now considered a cold case, he says that doesn’t mean they’ve given up hope of solving it. He says Mr. Jawhari passed away but they still have contact with Mrs. Jawhari as well as Randa’s brother and sisters on a fairly regular basis. Aro says they will do everything they can to get the family some closure and he hopes it happens, noting they still receive tips from time to time, just not as many as in the beginning. Police have long said they believe there are one or two people out there who know something that could really open up the case and provide the tips they need to solve it. A person of interest was identified early on in the case, described as an associate of Jawhari’s who would transport her to different appointments. Detective Scott Townsend is in charge of the case and Aro says anyone with information can also contact Crime Stoppers at 1-800-SPEAK-UP. There is still a reward being offered and the information is passed along anonymously.
  3. http://www.nbcnews.com/feature/cold-case-spotlight/more-questions-answers-nearly-42-years-after-washington-teen-vanishes-n688811 More Questions than Answers Nearly 42 Years after Washington Teen Vanishes Cold Case Spotlight Nov 27 2016, 4:58 pm ET by Rachael Trost When you read about Laurie Partridge's case, you're left with more questions than answers. Laurie was the oldest of six children, was on her high school's drill team, wrote for the school newspaper, and was hoping to marry her high school sweetheart soon. But on December 4, 1974, Laurie disappeared. "Laurie was such a beautiful, beautiful person," Laurie's younger sister Kimberly Partridge Carroll told NBC affiliate KHQ in 2010. "Whoever took her changed the whole course of our lives." Laurie, 17 at the time, had left her classes at Ferris High School in Spokane, Washington around noon that day, telling friends and teachers she was suffering from menstrual cramps She did not have a car, or anyone to give her a ride at that time, so she headed out on foot to walk the two or so miles home. Her family had just recently moved to the area from Fountain Valley, California. Family members reportedly knew something was wrong when the blonde, blue-eyed teen failed to show for her shift at the Lincoln Heights Theater. After contacting her boyfriend and several friends, they called police to report her missing. Laurie's father had bought her two general admission tickets to a Beach Boys concert for later that week at the Spokane Coliseum. Family members said there was no way she'd miss the concert, so police went to see if they could spot her there. But she did not show up. Her tickets, however, had been used. Authorities were never able to uncover if it was Laurie or someone else who used them. Laurie's loved ones were insistent that she would never leave on her own. She had just become engaged to her 20-year-old boyfriend, and the two had planned to go pick out an engagement ring. She was settling into her new life in Washington and was looking forward to her future, according to newspaper reports from the time. Investigators questioned several people over the years in connection with Laurie's disappearance, but no charges have ever been filed. Laurie's boyfriend was extensively investigated, but was never named a suspect in the case. The notorious serial killer Ted Bundy was even interviewed, but was ruled out at as he was in Utah at the time of Laurie's disappearance. In 2011, detectives announced they had a new witness who said he had seen Laurie several hours after she left to walk home talking to a white male in his 40s or 50s near a white truck with a van backend and a dark door. Despite the new possible lead, Laurie's case remains unsolved. Laurie's siblings are now dotted throughout the country. Her parents divorced, but then remarried several years later. Her mother passed away in 2004, without any answers as to what happened to her oldest daughter. "It's torture not knowing," Laurie's sister Kimberly told NBC affiliate KHQ. "It's absolute torture." If you have any information regarding Laurie's case, please call the Spokane Crime Check at (509) 456-2233. For more information, you can visit the Facebook page 'Laurie Partridge Missing from Spokane, WA' or the website lauriepartridgemissing.weebly.com.
  4. http://www.cullmantimes.com/news/tabitha-franklin-case-leads-local-investigators-to-illinois/article_a9d6c466-a3a0-11e6-bf2e-fb556c880f84.html Tabitha Franklin case leads local investigators to Illinois David Palmer 11/5/2016 Investigators with the Cullman County Sheriff's Office were in Illinois last week questioning several people of interest in the case of Tabitha Franklin, who has been missing since 2009. Franklin, 28, was last seen on Aug. 13, 2009, at a residence in West Point. "We were following up on some information in regards to a person of interest in the case," said Cullman County Sheriff Matt Gentry. "This person was questioned in 2009 and fled the area after questioning. We questioned multiple individuals while we were in Illinois. Even though this case started in 2009, it's still a priority. With it being an ongoing investigation we can't release details on the information at this time." WREX in Rockford, Illinois, reported the Winnebago County Sheriff's Office has been working with Cullman County investigators in the case. Numerous searches have been conducted over the past seven years, but Franklin has never been found. Family and friends of Franklin held a candlelight vigil in August and asked for anyone with information to contact authorities. Gentry said new information into the investigation of Franklin’s disappearance led local investigators to reach out to Winnebago County for assistance. Anyone with information about Tabitha Franklin's disappearance is asked to contact the Cullman County Sheriff’s Department, 256-734-0342. In Rockford, the sheriff's number is 815-319-6400.
  5. http://kutv.com/news/local/after-22-years-woman-still-trying-to-find-her-missing-mom After 22 years, woman still trying to find her missing mom by Christina Flores Thursday, November 3rd 2016 (KUTV) 27-year-old Stephanie Cook has spent 22 years of her life wondering what happened to her mother, Bobbi Ann Campbell. “I can’t go for the rest of my life not knowing what happened to my mom,” said Cook who was five when her mother disappeared never to be seen again. Now, Cook is trying to raise money for a reward hoping that will generate tips for police who are on the case. Cook, who is now a wife and mother to two young children, still remembers the day her mother took her to a friend’s house and left her there while she went to pick up her paycheck and buy groceries. “I fell asleep in the window seat waiting. I was really upset she didn’t come back,” said Cook about the last day she ever saw her mother. Nearly one year later, Bobbi Ann’s Chevy Nova was found in a Salt Lake Neighborhood near the state fair grounds. A neighbor reported the car had been there for months. Stephanie’s grandfather had the car towed back to the family’s home long before police were ever called. There was no opportunity for police to collect evidence. Stephanie said her mom’s car was found intact. Her money, clean laundry (done the day she went missing) and Christmas presents were still in the car. Although she’s thought of every possible scenario, she can’t imagine her mother left her on purpose. “She loved me,” she said noting her mother took her camping and fishing and was always around. Stephanie still remembers her mother’s smile and hugs. All she wants is to know what happened – not matter what the truth is. Detective Ben Pender with Unified Police is newly assigned to the old case. He agrees, that given she had a job, a family and a daughter she loved, Bobbi Ann didn’t seem to have a reason to walk away from her life but he has to go through the case from scratch. Pender hopes someone out there still has information about Bobbi Ann that could lead to answers for her daughter. Even a small tip can help in an investigation that he says is like putting together pieces of a puzzle. “That may be the piece that’s missing in this case,” he said. Pender said he will take tips – even anonymously – at this number: (385)468-9816.
  6. http://themissouritimes.com/35430/skeletal-remains-identified-lynn-messer/ Skeletal remains identified as those of Lynn Messer BLOOMSDALE, Mo. – For more than two years, Lynn Messer’s family has wondered where she went and what happened to her. Now, they finally have some answers. Sheriff Gary Stolzer says the skeletal remains found on the Messer family farm have been positively identified as those of Lynn Messer. The identification was done by an anthropologist with the St. Louis Medical Examiner’s Office. “Lynn’s dental records are a match and the authorities have confirmed to me that the remains found Tuesday evening are absolutely those of my Bride,” he wrote. Authorities have searched for clues of Lynn’s whereabouts since she disappeared on the morning of July 8, 2014. Her remains were found by her son, Aarron Messer, and his two teenage daughters in a wooded area near the edge of the family’s property on Tuesday night. They called the sheriff’s department, who secured the area before an FBI forensic team could process the scene on Wednesday morning. The family was informed of the positive identification Friday afternoon. “Once again I ask for prayers for our family – Lynn’s mother and sisters along with their families, and our sons along with their families,” Kerry wrote. A cause of death has not yet been determined, and there is still no word on whether investigators suspect foul play. he news was confirmed by Lynn’s husband, Kerry Messer, on the ‘Find Lynn Messer’ Facebook page early Friday evening.
  7. From Lynn's husband, Kerry: Remains Confirmed: We do not yet have a complete picture from the pathology lab regarding causes or other details, but at least we now have the primary confirmation which we thought we would have to wait much longer for. Lynn’s dental records are a match and the authorities have confirmed to me that the remains found Tuesday evening are absolutely those of my Bride. Once again I ask for prayers for our family – Lynn’s mother and sisters along with their families, and our sons along with their families. God’s hand is once again revealed: Law enforcement policies do not accommodate the gathering of such records during a case like this unless there is an actual body available to be identified. Despite my pleas for all possible medical and dental records, hip replacement serial numbers, eyeglass prescriptions, etc., the Sheriff’s office could not expend the resources in violation of standard policies. (Note: I was able to eventually direct them to a source for Lynn’s DNA so it could be entered into a national database for law enforcement nationwide.) However, an unidentified body case from the northwest part of the country (I think maybe Pennsylvania) resulted in an internal request to our Sheriff’s department well over a year and a half ago. That request for Lynn’s dental records resulted in the lead detective’s personal retrieval of her records. Today, those records have shaved days off our gut-wrenching wait for this news. But even more amazing than that is how the dental office responded to the request for Lynn’s dental records. It seems that her good dental hygiene habits from childhood has caused her to need very little dental work through the years. Thus it had been over seven years since she had been to her dentist. Are you ready for this… As related to me, after the fact, the office manager for the dental practice expressed a degree of awe noting that Lynn’s records were literally only days away from being destroyed! All Glory To God!
  8. I have received potentially devastating news for families of the missing. The National Institute of Justice (NIJ) has decided to end funding for DNA analysis for missing persons and unidentified remains after this year. With approximately 600,000 + missing persons reported per year, and an estimated 40,000 + unidentified persons, the impact on the budgets of local law enforcement, coroners’ offices, the state, and other impacted entities to take over these costs would be massive. Families of the missing should not be forced or expected to incur these charges. DNA has become a key and critical factor in resolving these cases. Countless cases have been solved using this technology, providing much needed answers for grieving families. In cases of foul play, it gives law enforcement a path for criminal investigation often resulting in justice, and fewer criminals on our streets, left to commit more crimes. We have been told that it is possible we can get the NIJ to reverse this decision. We need to work together to make this happen. We are asking interested persons to write letters to the 2 addresses listed below the statement. Ask these government representatives to rescind this decision. This needs to be done within weeks, if not sooner. Please do not delay. In doing this, you are helping families of the missing today, and all who will sadly and surely follow. Without DNA analysis, the suffering families will be left in the trauma of ambiguous loss, possibly forever. Steps to take: Share this event with like-minded persons who will help. Draft and mail letter to reps explaining your involvement or interest in missing persons and ask them to reinstate the funding. (My personal letter is found below the Official Statement.) Official Statement: The Office of Justice Programs (OJP), National Institute of Justice (NIJ) has made the decision to discontinue funding for the Using DNA Technology to Identify the Missing award after this year. Many laboratories have been past recipients of this award, which provides funding for forensic DNA and anthropological services to resolve missing and unidentified person cases across the country. Absence of future funding for these services will negatively impact thousands of law enforcement agencies, medical examiners, and coroners across the country who depend upon the valuable resources this funding provides; however, most important, families may never find their missing loved one or see perpetrators brought to justice without this funding. Identifying human remains is often the first step to resolving a homicide investigation, and without accessible and affordable forensic DNA services, many investigations will never be resolved. Last year, over 600,000 people – both adults and children – were reported missing in the United States, many under suspicious circumstances, including homicide. Funds from the Using DNA Technology to Identify the Missing award allow many of these victims to be identified through DNA testing and Combined DNA Index System (CODIS) hits. These resources benefit local, state, and federal agencies throughout the country, as well as the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children and the National Missing and Unidentified Persons System (NamUs). If DNA laboratories are no longer able to provide free DNA services through this award, the effectiveness of these agencies will be hampered, and families across the United States may never locate their missing loved ones or see justice served. It is important that OJP/NIJ continues to support this critical component of the criminal justice system. Please take a moment to tell OJP/NIJ leadership how important this award is to you, as a family member impacted by a missing or deceased loved one who relies/relied upon these services for resolution, by sending a letter to: Office of Justice Programs National Institute of Justice Attn: Nancy Rodriguez& Karol Mason 810 7th St. N.W. Washington, DC 20531 Sally Yates, Deputy Attorney General U.S. Department of Justice 950 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW Washington, DC 20530-0001 My personal letter: I was shocked and dismayed to learn that the NIJ is no longer going to provide funding for the analysis of DNA for missing and unidentified persons. You know the numbers and you know of the numerous success cases from utilizing this technology. I don’t need to repeat those. My own son, Jason Jolkowski, has been missing without a trace from Omaha, NE since June 13, 2001. 15 years is a very long time to live without answers. Our family is entirely grateful to have had the assistance of these grants to obtain family reference sample DNA, which has been submitted into CODIS. We are not alone in having a case in which we have no dental records or fingerprints to identify Jason, should his body be found. Not only is DNA our only hope, but we also must depend on a coroner’s office with custody of his body to have knowledge of best practice and submit the DNA of the remains for analysis and entry into CODIS. If his body has already been found, we wait and hope that the authorities in that location will do the right thing, but without funding, those odds decrease greatly. In addition, if his body were to be found in the future, a future without this funding, it’s highly unlikely that DNA analysis will be performed. This means that my family will likely NEVER have answers. This also means that the thousands upon thousands of other families in a similar situation will also not have answers. You are also aware that resolving a missing person case means that law enforcement now can do a proper investigation in cases of foul play, potentially bringing about justice and keeping these criminals off our streets where they are free to commit more crimes. More crimes equal more law enforcement efforts needed, which means more money for local agencies and states who are already fighting tight budget constraints. Another impact is on the family members of missing persons. The ongoing trauma of ambiguous loss takes a clear toll on the mental and physical health of the person. Many are forced to seek treatment for a variety of ailments that are a result of this trauma. Some may even become incapacitated and unable to function as they had prior, potentially requiring local or state government assistance. It is imperative to solve missing person cases as quickly as possible to avoid additional stresses on the families of the missing. Everyone deserves answers. NIJ provides NCMEC with $28 million in funding per year. This issue is not one of missing children versus missing adults, but is for all missing persons. Keep in mind, however, that there is little to no government assistance in cases of missing adults. Services such as the DNA funding, NamUs, and labs like CHI need to remain intact. Please don’t take away what little we have. Let’s be clear: Without NIJ funding for DNA analysis, everyone loses. (Except for the criminals) Please reconsider this decision. We’re all counting on you. Kelly Murphy, Mother of Missing Jason Jolkowski President and Founder, Project Jason www.projectjason.org
  9. http://www.kctv5.com/story/33288936/five-years-later-new-theories-revealed-in-baby-lisa-irwins-disappearance Five years later: New theories revealed in baby Lisa Irwin’s disappearance Updated: Oct 04, 2016 6:46 AM PST By Chris Oberholtz, Digital Content Manager By Angie Ricono, Investigative Reporter ANSAS CITY, MO (KCTV) - The disappearance of baby Lisa Irwin is a crime that still baffles Kansas City five years later. The 10-month-old was last seen in her crib on Oct. 3, 2011. She simply vanished. Lisa’s parents believe their daughter is alive. “There’s not a doubt in my mind, and I’m her mom. I obviously I have my mother’s intuition, and I have never once felt for a second that she has been hurt or gone," Lisa’s mother, Deborah Bradley, said. Her parents believe she was kidnapped and then sold. “This was not a one-person deal,” Lisa’s father, Jeremy Irwin, said. Police originally zeroed in on Bradley as a possible suspect. The parents say they hold no grudges. Bradley drank with a neighbor the night Lisa went missing. She eventually told investigators that she didn’t remember if she checked on her daughter before she went to bed about 10:40 p.m. The last check may have been 6:40 p.m. Bradley said she passed a lie detector test. However, police originally told her she failed as a tactic to force a confession. Bradley said she understands and respects why police did that. “Absolutely! Some of the stuff you see on the news with parents and their children … just horrid things! I can completely understand. It's just after some point in time you got to look elsewhere,” Bradley said. Oct. 3, 2011 Jeremy Irwin called 911 to report his daughter missing. He returned home from work at 4 a.m. The front door was unlocked. Lisa was missing from her crib. The family reported their three cell phones were also missing, and nothing else was taken. Police issued an Amber Alert and quickly released pictures of Lisa with her big blue eyes. Investigators combed fields near the Irwin home, drained wells, and police even searched neighbors’ homes looking for Lisa. The investigation became the intense focus of national media. Information dripped out day-by-day. The missing cell phones were pinged close to the Irwin home and were accessed throughout the night Lisa went missing. A cadaver dog reportedly smelled something in the parent’s bedroom. And burnt baby clothes were found inside a neighborhood dumpster. One tip that became public involved a handyman, John “Jersey Joe” Tanko, who had a criminal record and worked in the neighborhood. He dated Megan Wright, who publicly reported her cell phone was called by one of those missing cell phones. Wright said many other people had access to her cell phone, and she would not make or receive that call. Police never named Tanko a suspect and said he cooperated with investigators who were satisfied with his answers. Originally attorney speaks out Cyndy Short represented the family in the early days of the investigation. She is the attorney the family still keeps in contact with today. She calls the parents credible and heartbroken. “My gut tells me without any doubt that somebody unknown to the family came into this home was in and out of the home very quickly,” Short said. Short conducted her own investigation with staff from her office. They spoke to people in the neighborhood who say they saw a man and an under-dressed baby the night Lisa went missing. “Our prayer is once the baby left this area … she ended up somewhere safe and warm. Statistically, that's probably not the outcome, but it's the one we pray for,” Short said. Stranger abductions Stranger Abductions are incredibly rare. There are only a handful of cases of newborn babies being kidnapped. Those are generally violent attacks involving infants being cut out of the womb. “Why would this child at this age be disappearing now?” former FBI agent Michael Tabman questions. Tabman said Lisa’s age probably troubled investigators. Kidnappings generally involve middle school-aged girls. Tabman points out high profile examples like 11-year-old Jaycee Dugard, 12-year-old Poly Klass and 14-year-old Elizabeth Smart. “I do not believe this was a stranger abduction,” Tabman said. Where the investigation stands today Police say this is still an active investigation and have received 573 tips regarding Lisa’s disappearance. Lisa’s parents hope the anniversary of her disappearance raises awareness and prompts more tips. They point to the $100,000 reward that’s still available in the case. “Think of her, think of how much she deserves to be with the people who love her the most,” Lisa’s mother said. “Or think of yourself and take the money and leave town. Whatever it's going to take,” adds Lisa’s father. If you have any information call the TIPS Hotline at 816-474-TIPS.
  10. http://www.waow.com/story/33295636/2016/10/01/story-of-missing-antigo-teen-picked-up-by-national-tv-show?utm_medium=social&utm_source=facebook_WAOW_Newsline_9 Story of Missing Antigo Teen picked up by national TV show By Daniel Keith, Multimedia Journalist Posted: Oct 01, 2016 4:11 PM PST ANTIGO, Wis. (WAOW) - The story of a missing Antigo teen is about to go national, as the case was picked up by Investigation Discovery for their series called Disappeared. Seven years ago, 15-year-old Kayla Berg went missing, after she was last seen in Wausau outside of her boyfriend's house. On Saturday, friends and family gathered at the Bad Habit Bar in Deerbrook to hold a pool tournament to help raise money for new signs to hang around the area. Kayla's mother Hope Sprenger said the signs are a way to remind people that Kayla is still missing and the new TV special is the best way to gather any new leads. "More people can know what's going on and maybe she's out there or whatever," Sprenger said. "Maybe they'll finally come forward with some new information they know." Friends of the family like Shanon Nahrath also believe the show will help break the case. "I'm thinking somebody might finally come out and talk," Nahrath said. "I'm thinking it might help." Sprenger hopes that the case going on a national level will help end the nightmare. "It's really an emotional roller coaster that never goes away and never gets easier," Sprenger said. Producers of the show did not want to comment on Kayla's case at this time.
  11. Eligibility: The retreat is open to immediate family members (spouse, biological parent(s), legal guardians, adult siblings, adult children and the spouses of all mentioned) of still missing persons whose cases are listed with law enforcement agencies in North America and who have registered with us for services. The attendee needs to be age 18 or older. Note: If you have not registered your missing loved one for services with us, you must do that prior to registering for the retreat and then obtain verification of eligibility from us. To register a missing loved one: http://projectjason.org/register-a-missing-person.html Registration for 2017 is open now: https://projectjason.org/retreat-registration.html
  12. http://www.nbcnewyork.com/news/local/Missing-Flight-Attendant-Who-Walked-Out-of-LaGuardia-Airport-Found-Dead-393794881.html Remains of Missing Flight Attendant from Queens Found: Family, Police By Natalie Pasquarella 9/16/2016 The body of the Delta flight attendant who went missing in January, when she apparently quit her job ahead of a flight and walked out of LaGuardia Airport, has been found, her parents tell NBC 4 New York. Family members had been searching for 30-year-old Sierra Shields since she was last seen walking out of the airport on Jan. 14. Her family says police contacted them and said they found their daughter's remains. It's not clear how she died. During an unrelated briefing with reporters Thursday, NYPD Chief of Detectives Bob Boyce said bones had washed up on Rikers Island, and that "we believe we've identified that female from the clothing that washed up with the bones." "It appears to be -- and we haven't made an ID on it yet -- from someone who took their own life and jumped in the water," he said. He continued, "That person went missing earlier this year. The clothes that were recovered were very distinctive. We believe we're on the right track, but the OCME has to do their work first." Police said Friday correction offers on the Rikers Island jail complex were training when they found the remains. Shields' family said in a statement Friday, "We are eternally grateful for the outpouring of love and support for our beautiful sweet Sierra. We are truly thankful for how God used Sierra's life to reflect the beauty of His Kingdom. Our family is requesting privacy at this time as we cherish the memory of our precious Sierra." Sierra's mother, Donna Shields, previously told NBC 4 New York her daughter left her apartment in Queens, and like she always did, walked nearly two miles to LaGuardia Airport, where she was scheduled to work a flight originating there. Hours before her scheduled shift, she asked her supervisor if she could speak to her union representative, but the union representative wasn't there. Sierra wouldn't tell her supervisor why she wanted to speak to her -- which was out of character for her because the two were close. Sierra then left her work pass on her supervisor's desk and walked out of the terminal. Surveillance video shows Sierra walking out of Marine Terminal, but it's not clear which direction she went. Police have not released the video, but her family said it only showed about three seconds of her walking. She was wearing her flight attendant dress, but not her full uniform. Her family previously said she does not have a history of depression, and described her as a person who would go out of her way to help others. They fear it was her generosity that may have gotten her into trouble. "My gut tells me she was helping someone," her mother, Donna Shields, told NBC 4 New York in May, when she and Sierra's father flew in from Chicago to look for their daughter. "We don't know who she may have met. She is just... We just don't know. It's hard not knowing," Donna Shields said at the time. Source: Remains of Missing Flight Attendant from Queens Found: Family, Police | NBC New York http://www.nbcnewyork.com/news/local/Missing-Flight-Attendant-Who-Walked-Out-of-LaGuardia-Airport-Found-Dead-393794881.html#ixzz4KnvUFlYv Follow us: @nbcnewyork on Twitter | NBCNewYork on Facebook Her family says police contacted them and said they found their daughter's remains. It's not clear how she died. During an unrelated briefing with reporters Thursday, NYPD Chief of Detectives Bob Boyce said bones had washed up on Rikers Island, and that "we believe we've identified that female from the clothing that washed up with the bones." "It appears to be -- and we haven't made an ID on it yet -- from someone who took their own life and jumped in the water," he said. He continued, "That person went missing earlier this year. The clothes that were recovered were very distinctive. We believe we're on the right track, but the OCME has to do their work first." Police said Friday correction offers on the Rikers Island jail complex were training when they found the remains. Shields' family said in a statement Friday, "We are eternally grateful for the outpouring of love and support for our beautiful sweet Sierra. We are truly thankful for how God used Sierra's life to reflect the beauty of His Kingdom. Our family is requesting privacy at this time as we cherish the memory of our precious Sierra." Sierra's mother, Donna Shields, previously told NBC 4 New York her daughter left her apartment in Queens, and like she always did, walked nearly two miles to LaGuardia Airport, where she was scheduled to work a flight originating there. Hours before her scheduled shift, she asked her supervisor if she could speak to her union representative, but the union representative wasn't there. Sierra wouldn't tell her supervisor why she wanted to speak to her -- which was out of character for her because the two were close. Sierra then left her work pass on her supervisor's desk and walked out of the terminal. Surveillance video shows Sierra walking out of Marine Terminal, but it's not clear which direction she went. Police have not released the video, but her family said it only showed about three seconds of her walking. She was wearing her flight attendant dress, but not her full uniform. Her family previously said she does not have a history of depression, and described her as a person who would go out of her way to help others. They fear it was her generosity that may have gotten her into trouble. "My gut tells me she was helping someone," her mother, Donna Shields, told NBC 4 New York in May, when she and Sierra's father flew in from Chicago to look for their daughter. "We don't know who she may have met. She is just... We just don't know. It's hard not knowing," Donna Shields said at the time.
  13. http://www.oregonlive.com/cycling/index.ssf/2016/09/cycle_oregon_volunteer_mark_bo.html Cycle Oregon volunteer Mark Bosworth vanished 5 years ago; his Fund provides legacy By Allan Brettman | The Oregonian/OregonLive on September 17, 2016 at 8:00 AM GLENDALE – It's been five years since Cycle Oregon volunteer Mark Bosworth went missing on the last day of the 2011 ride. Hours after Bosworth's disappearance on Sept. 16, 2011, a massive search was launched in and around Riddle, the next-to-last community the weeklong bike ride visited, and the last place Bosworth was seen. His disappearance remains a mystery. On Friday, Bosworth's wife, Julie Bosworth, and their daughters, Kelly and Claire, stopped in Riddle to pause and remember that time five years ago in the Douglas County community. Then they continued driving south on Interstate 5 to Glendale, where they celebrated with five people a continued legacy of Mark Bosworth's participation with Cycle Oregon. Julie, Kelly and Claire – as well as Bosworth's look-alike brother, Eric – had dinner with the five winners of this year's Mark Bosworth Fund. The fund pays a first-time rider's entry fee – which was $985 this year – plus $100 for other expenses. Mark Bosworth, family members say, loved Cycle Oregon and was concerned the cost of the ride was prohibitive to people who otherwise would have wanted to participate in the event. While the fund was initially intended to pay a single entry fee each year, the Bosworth's said they found the application essays of the fund recipients to be too compelling to limit the award to one or even two riders. This year, the fund paid for three entry fees; also, Cycle Oregon co-sponsor Johnson RV donated two of its entries to the fund. This is the fourth year the fund has provided at least one entry fee. The fund recipients this year were Hagen Hammons of Raleigh, N.C.; Monique Ybarra of Hillsboro; Trina Kanewa of Springfield; Oscar Fernandez of Portland; and Carly Reimer of Del Rio, Texas. The fund has $15,000 and needs more donations to sustain continued gifts to worthy, first-time riders, Julie Bosworth said. Donations can be made through the fund's website, markbosworthfund.org.
  14. http://www.modbee.com/news/article101148902.html September 10, 2016 5:25 PM Families of missing gather in Columbia By Jeff Jardine jjardine@modbee.com With nearly two dozen people missing or unaccounted for in Tuolumne County since 1980, family members and friends came together at Columbia State Historic Park on Saturday for the first Tuolumne County Missing Persons Awareness Day. About 75 people attended the event, which included a group prayer and testimonies by some family members about their missing loved ones. The event was organized by private investigator Chuck Jones; his wife, Andrea; former Carole Sund-Carrington Memorial Reward Foundation Director Kim Petersen; and Linda Hatter, whose son, Allen Martin, disappeared in February and is still one of the missing. The families of seven of the missing were represented: Carl Knight (April 2008), Allen Martin (February 2016), Nita Mayo (August 2005), Troy Galloway (March 2016), Darvis Lee Jr. (October 2010), Willie Elgen (January 2011) and Patty Tolhurst (April 2014). The organizers hope to make it an annual event aimed at keeping the cases in the public eye in hopes of gaining information that will bring them answers.
  15. http://www.modbee.com/news/article101148902.html September 10, 2016 5:25 PM Families of missing gather in Columbia By Jeff Jardine jjardine@modbee.com With nearly two dozen people missing or unaccounted for in Tuolumne County since 1980, family members and friends came together at Columbia State Historic Park on Saturday for the first Tuolumne County Missing Persons Awareness Day. About 75 people attended the event, which included a group prayer and testimonies by some family members about their missing loved ones. The event was organized by private investigator Chuck Jones; his wife, Andrea; former Carole Sund-Carrington Memorial Reward Foundation Director Kim Petersen; and Linda Hatter, whose son, Allen Martin, disappeared in February and is still one of the missing. The families of seven of the missing were represented: Carl Knight (April 2008), Allen Martin (February 2016), Nita Mayo (August 2005), Troy Galloway (March 2016), Darvis Lee Jr. (October 2010), Willie Elgen (January 2011) and Patty Tolhurst (April 2014). The organizers hope to make it an annual event aimed at keeping the cases in the public eye in hopes of gaining information that will bring them answers. Read more here: http://www.modbee.com/news/article101148902.html#storylink=cpy