Kelly

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  1. http://13wham.com/news/local/new-clues-but-still-no-closure-for-brian-sullivans-family New clues, but still no closure for Brian Sullivan's family by Matt Molloy 6/30/2017 CHILI, N.Y. -- After a decade-long mystery, a Chili family is still searching for their missing loved one. "We've always told Barb and Dan that we will find Brian, and I'm convinced that we will at some point,” said Captain Douglas Comanzo with the Monroe County Sheriff's Office. Investigators believe Brian Sullivan was murdered in July of 2007. The man they believe killed Brian died last year. 13WHAM has new clues in the case and a plea from Brian Sullivan’s family. "We just want to bring Brian home and place Brian where we choose, not where someone else chose,” said Brian’s mother Barbara. Brian disappeared on July 8th, 2007. The 19-year-old was last seen at the Burger King on Chili Avenue. Early on investigators received a tip that Brian may have been murdered. “We had information, real cryptic in the first two weeks of the investigation, that a white male was killed in the city,” said Comanzo. Then came a suspect, Derrick Murray. Police believe Murray and Sullivan met at the Chili Inn bar. Murray told investigators he and Brian had drinks on several occasions and smoked marijuana. The night of July 8th police believe the two were together and ended up at a vacant home in the Chili Avenue area. "Brian was in a house, an unoccupied house in the city and there was some type of altercation there, and Brian was killed in that house,” said Comanzo. Brian's car was later found abandoned on Lettington Avenue in Gates. Investigators got multiple tips that someone was paid to drive his car to that dead end road. "That does seem to repeat itself, that someone not involved was actually used to move that vehicle from where Brian had parked to where it was found by the Gates Police Department,” said Comanzo. Brian's body was never found. Last year, Derrick Murray died. That's when investigators went public and announced that Murray had always been their prime suspect. "I can't believe it's 10 years and we are still sitting here in my kitchen wondering where Brian is,” said Barbara Sullivan. You'll find posters of Brian throughout the Sullivan's home along with a word that has haunted this family for a decade; Missing. "I remember when I knew, we were doing the three months, we were doing a little vigil outside and I woke up that morning and I knew that he was not coming home,” she said. Barbara and Daniel now have two beautiful grandchildren from their daughter and wonder what could have been for Brian. "They know who uncle Brian is, if they are spending the night, they sleep in Uncle Brian's bed. They would have cousins to play with, it's hard,” said Barbara Sullivan. While Murray's death in August of 2016 was a significant setback, investigators still hope to find Brian's remains. "We fully believe that the Murray family knows what's going on, what's happening and the possible location of where Brian is at this point,” said Comanzo. "It makes me angry. It makes me angry because I know if it was their family member they would be screaming out and we've been screaming for 10 years and nothing. It's time,” said Sullivan. Barbara says it is time for someone to step forward so her family can stop wondering and grieve the loss of a son. "If it was your family, your son, your daughter, your brother, your sister, your mother you'd want to bring them home to the family that loves them and cares about them. Please, just come forward and tell us where our boy is." There is a reward for information leading to Brian’s whereabouts. You can call Crime Stoppers at 423-9300 with information and you can remain anonymous.
  2. From the Family: Please come out and join us on Saturday, July 8th, for our 11th annual gathering for Roxanne Paltauf Day. This will mark 11 years since Roxanne disappeared. We will be handing out flyers and bumper stickers to help find Roxanne. We plan on meeting at 8:00am through 11:00am in the empty field next to the Texaco Station at 408 E Rundberg Ln, Austin, TX 78753. This is blocks from I-35.
  3. http://www.nj.com/union/index.ssf/2017/06/a_decade_after_he_went_missing_search_for_plainfie.html A decade after he went missing, search for Plainfield man goes on Updated on June 17, 2017 at 12:23 PMPosted on June 17, 2017 at 11:00 AM By Marisa Iati miati@njadvancemedia.com, NJ Advance Media for NJ.com PLAINFIELD -- Almost a decade after Aaron Watkins disappeared from Plainfield, his biological mom said she still wakes up crying. Watkins, then 18, apparently parked his Jeep Wrangler on the shoulder of the Garden State Parkway's Driscoll Bridge on the evening of Nov. 11, 2007. Police initially believed he jumped, but his body has not been found. "Aaron deserves to be found, whether he's alive or deceased, and to be put to rest," his biological mother, Barbara Erickson, said last week. "He had a difficult life." Watkins is one of only two or three cases Plainfield police have of people missing for longer than five years, but more than 1,100 people in New Jersey vanished months, years or decades ago. Plainfield Officer Stephen Bailey, who has been investigating Watkins' case since last year, said the probe now involves mostly people calling to say they may have seen him. "We don't have any new information to go on," Bailey said Tuesday. "The people we've interviewed in the past, their story hasn't changed." Erickson acknowledged her son, who was adopted by a Garwood family at age 9, had a troubled history and had threatened suicide before. But she said she doesn't believe he would have killed himself. She said she thinks he could have run away or that someone close to him could have been involved in his disappearance. But Bailey said police do not suspect foul play and authorities cleared everyone they interviewed of suspected involvement. Watkins's roommate, who was also his supervisor at a construction job, reported Watkins missing after he didn't return from supposedly going to collect his belongings from an acquaintance's home, Erickson said. A State Police dive team searched the Raritan River near the Driscoll Bridge for a few days after the Jeep was found with Watkins' phone inside, but the divers didn't find him, Bailey said. "There were fishermen who claimed to hear a thump at the bottom of the bridge, but we were never able to verify whether that was a body or something else," he said. Erickson said she still holds out hope that the boy she remembers as a jokester and a class clown could be alive. As a kid, Watkins laughed through everything and cheered up the people around him, Erickson said. "No matter how you disciplined him, he would just look at you with his dimples and smile," she said. "You couldn't stay mad at Aaron. ... He was my sunshine." Bailey urged anyone who thinks they see Watkins or another missing person to immediately call local police or security and not to lose sight of that person. "Worst case scenario, it won't be him, and they go on their merry way, but if it is him, we want to find him," Bailey said. Watkins was described as 5-feet 6-inches and 140 pounds when he went missing. He has brown hair, blue eyes, a pierced tongue, pierced ears and a mole under his right eye. Plainfield police ask anyone with information about Watkins' whereabouts to call the department at 908-753-3021.
  4. http://www.stjoechannel.com/story/35651765/sjpd-to-search-area-for-missing-teen-of-13-years SJPD Search Area for Missing Teen of 13 Years Tuesday, June 13th 2017, 6:21 am PDT by Kristina Zagame Updated: Tuesday, June 13th 2017, 6:25 am PDT ST. JOSEPH, Mo. The St. Joseph Police Department will be investigating an area in the north end of the city on Tuesday in reference to the missing persons investigation of Ashley Martinez. Capt. Jeff Wilson said the operation began around 6 a.m. Tuesday and will run until Wednesday afternoon in the vicinity of Huntoon Road and West Highland Avenue. Martinez has been missing since July of 2004 after she was dropped off at the Krug Pool. The National Center for Missing and Exploited Children will assist SJPD in the operation. Wilson said the search is based on historical information related to the case. There are no further details about the search at this time. We will continue to update this article as more information becomes available.
  5. http://www.3newsnow.com/news/local-news/after-16-years-jason-jolkowski-still-missing After 16 years, Jason Jolkowski still missing 6:59 AM, Jun 13, 2017 9:09 AM, Jun 13, 2017 OMAHA, Neb. (KMTV) - Today, June 13, 2017, marks 16 years since Omaha teen Jason Jolkowski disappeared from the driveway of his home in the Benson neighborhood. One of Omaha's most perplexing mysteries, police still have the case open, and they, along with the family are in need of a valid lead or tip that will finally solve the case. Jason was 19 when he disappeared after being called to work unexpectedly. He had arranged a ride to pick him up at Benson High School. The ride showed up, but Jason was not there. He was not seen on school video and was never heard from again. Neither Omaha Police or the family believe him to be a runaway. Persons with information are encouraged to call Omaha Police at 402-444-5818. If you want to remain anonymous, you may call 402-444-STOP. Additional information can be found at: http://projectjason.org/forums/topic/42-missing-man-jason-anthony-jolkowski-ne-06132001/
  6. http://www.wsaw.com/content/news/Kayla-Berg-disappearance-to-air-Sunday-on-Investigation-Discovery-425936454.html By Heather Poltrock | Posted: Fri 9:37 AM, Jun 02, 2017 | Updated: Fri 9:44 AM, Jun 02, 2017 Kayla Berg disappearance to air Sunday on Investigation Discovery ANTIGO, Wis. (WSAW) -- Investigation Discovery will air an episode Sunday night at 8 p.m. highlighting the case of a missing Antigo teen. Kayla Berg was reported missing in August 2009. Kayla's mother, Hope Sprenger said she wasn't sure how her daughter's story was selected, but did say she had written into the show a few years ago. Berg's case was also featured on CNN's Find Our Children segment in 2010. Berg is described as a white female, 5 foot 2 inches (at time of disappearance), 108 pounds (at time of disappearance), brown hair and brown eyes. Kayla’s ears and navel are pierced. She also has scars on the right side of her nose and on her right shin. Anyone with information on her whereabouts are asked to call 715-627-6411.
  7. http://www.kwwl.com/story/31747035/2016/04/Sunday/family-celebrates-birthday-of-missing-girl Cedar Rapids family celebrates birthday of missing girl Written by Shirley Descorbeth, Multimedia Journalist Posted: Apr 17, 2016 4:23 PM PST Updated: May 01, 2016 4:23 PM PST CEDAR RAPIDS (KWWL) - It's been 15 long years since Erin Pospisil vanished from her community, but she's not forgotten. "We're here to celebrate today, even though we can't celebrate with her," said Carolyn Pospisil who is Erin's stepmother. Family and friends are celebrating Erin's 30th birthday who went missing from a Cedar Rapids neighborhood in June of 2001. She was last seen getting inside a black Chevy Cavalier, but has never made it back home. Erin's father says it's been difficult for the family. "It's one of the worst things to have happened..is have a child go missing, you know, not knowing is the hardest part. You just wanna know what happened to them," said Jim Pospisil. In past years on the anniversary of Erin's disappearance, her family has paid tribute to her. This year, it's different. "This year because of the fact that it's her 30th birthday, we all have ideas and things we want to do by our 30th birthday, and things we want to have happened and the fact that this got interrupted for her is really hard for us," Carolyn added. Instead of bringing birthday presents to Erin's celebration -- people are donating to Metro High School, the school Erin attended. Her stepmother says, they make it through by not losing hope. "I have to. If I don't have hope that she's gonna come home tomorrow...I don't know how I'll get up tomorrow." The money raised will be used to send students on a service trip. If you have information on Erin's whereabouts, call police.
  8. http://www.wrcbtv.com/story/34043791/bcso-arrests-donnie-brantley-for-the-murder-of-his-wife-in-cold-case UPDATE: BCSO arrests Donnie Brantley for the murder of his wife in cold case Posted: Dec 13, 2016 1:31 PM PDT Updated: Dec 13, 2016 5:24 PM PDT By Natalie Potts BRADLEY COUNTY, TN (WRCB) - Bradley County investigators believe they've solved a 7-year-old cold case. Authorities announced Tuesday they have charged Donnie Brantley with 1st degree premeditated murder in the death of Marsha Brantley between May 1st and July 31st of 2009. Deputies say this is the second time Brantley has been charged with his wife's murder, all previous charges were dropped due to lack of evidence. It's a cold case that's been filled with twists and turns. Marsha Brantley was reported missing in November of 2009, her husband Donnie was indicted by a grand jury but charges against him were dropped in 2013, just 10 days before the trail. Family members and investigators agreed to the dismissal back then. At the time, they believed Donnie was guilty but they weren't sure if they had enough evidence to convince a jury beyond a reasonable doubt. Donnie Brantley has been a suspect in his wife's disappearance since the beginning. Deputies say he never reported her missing. He skipped town leaving behind all of their wedding photos and he kept changing his story. In fact, it was Marsha's hair dresser who filed the missing person's report months after she had stopped visiting the salon. Investigators are still searching for Marsha's body. Her family has declared her deceased. District Attorney Steve Crump wouldn't say what new evidence led to his decision on moving forward with the case but he did say the victim's family was behind him. Brantley was arraigned before a judge Tuesday afternoon, he told the judge his family was in the process of hiring an attorney. Deputies are still gathering evidence, they've asked anyone with information that could help investigators to please come forward. The news of Brantley's arrest comes as a relief to Marsha's family who has never given up hope. Family members have searched the couple's home from top to bottom and even dug up the basement floor with cadaver dogs in the past, nothing's been found. While family members hope to lay Marsha to rest one day, they say they will never stop fighting for justice. Brantley is being held on a $250,000 dollars bond. He's due back in court Tuesday December 20th for an attorney status hearing.
  9. http://www.news-leader.com/story/news/local/ozarks/2017/06/01/mother-missing-woman-dont-call-anniversary/351482001/ Mother of missing woman: Don't call it an anniversary Giacomo Bologna , GBOLOGNA@NEWS-LEADER.COM Published 11:15 p.m. CT May 31, 2017 | Updated 11:17 p.m. CT May 31, 2017 Standing in that bedroom on June 7, 1992, Janis McCall had no way of knowing her daughter would become part of Springfield's most puzzling unsolved disappearance. Instead, McCall was angry. Her daughter Stacy had just graduated from Kickapoo and was spending the night at a friend's home, but when Stacy didn't call her the next day, McCall went over to the central Springfield home. The doors were unlocked. And inside a room were Stacy McCall's shorts, shoes and bra in a neat pile on the floor next to the bed. Nearby were her keys, her bathing suit, her purse and her make-up kit. "I thought, 'This is absolutely stupid' — that she left her stuff here and she left her car and she didn't have any sense to call me," McCall said. Stacy was a beautiful, vibrant girl, McCall said. She used to model wedding dresses, and her long hair reached past her waist. Even now, when McCall sees a girl with hair that long, she has to get a glimpse of the girl's face just to see that it's not Stacy. Why didn't she call? And why was her car still parked outside? "Her shirt and her panties were all that she had," McCall said. The TV in the bedroom was turned on, but only static was on the screen. McCall went outside to her daughter's car and realized — this doesn't make sense. In the ensuing days, one of the largest missing-person searches ever began in southwest Missouri. They were looking for Stacy McCall, 18, Suzanne "Suzie" Streeter, 19, and Streeter's mother, Sherrill Levitt, 47. Stacy McCall and Streeter had left the graduation party in Battlefield together. They went to the central Springfield home of Streeter's mother, Levitt. That's the last known place the three missing women were believed to have been. Within a week, divers from the fire department had scoured Lake Springfield, police officers on horseback had searched fields, and more than 20,000 flyers had been distributed across the area. The day after their disappearance, a captain with the Springfield Police Department said: "We think we're heading in the right direction ... Our hopes remain high to get that one clue or that one phone call that really gives you a break in the case." Nearly 25 years have passed, and that clue or phone call still hasn't come. McCall said she's felt as though the case was on the brink of being solved countless times, calling those feelings an "emotional roller coaster." "You're at the lowest low and then you go up and you're at the highest high and you think 'I'm gonna have her home tonight. I'm gonna have my baby home,'" she said. "Then within a few hours or a few days, you're back to the lowest low again." How many times has she ridden that roller coaster? "I can't even begin to tell you," McCall said. "Truly, I don't believe that they're alive; I think they're probably gone. I don't know why or when or how long they were kept alive. ... I would love to find them in white slavery somewhere or sold to a sheik over in Iraq." Next Wednesday will be the 25th marker — not anniversary, she said — of their disappearance. "Anniversaries are something people celebrate," she said, "and we don't celebrate when the three missing women disappeared." The last time McCall said she saw her daughter was June 6, 1992, around 8:30 p.m. The family had just eaten and was taking pictures outside before cutting Stacy's graduation cake, McCall said. Stacy wanted to go to a party and then head to a water park in Branson later that night, McCall said, but McCall had a "horrible feeling" her daughter would get into an accident if they drove to Branson at night. Stacy hugged her mom and told her she would call. "She didn't cut her cake that night," McCall said. "She was going to cut it the next day." Just two hours later, Stacy called. They weren't going to Branson. Instead, she would be staying the night at a friend's house and she would call her mother in the morning. However, a little after 2 a.m., Stacy and Suzie left the party and went to Suzie's home. "I didn't ever get that call in the morning," McCall said. McCall would get thousands of phone calls about her daughter — tips, crank calls, cruel jokes and more — but no call from her daughter. McCall said she still gets calls about the missing women. "We had people call us and tell us they put them in a vat, and some people said they'd all been frozen and cut up into pieces and put into a kiln." Even the most unlikely tip gets forwarded on to police, McCall said. For a while, she said, she and her husband paid an "ex-con" to search for their daughter. "He said he could get in places that the police couldn't," McCall said. "He led us up and down the garden path and took our money." McCall said she had even arranged through friends to have a helicopter ready in case her daughter needed to be immediately picked up somewhere. "I had a lot of people who were willing to help us," she said. "I think people would have done anything to help us find them." Sometimes people still recognize McCall as the mother of Stacy, McCall said, especially when she's out with one of her other two daughters. Often people tell her they're praying for her and her missing daughter, she said. "I love the community. I love Springfield," McCall said. "The people have been friendly." Looking back at the initial investigation, McCall said she is thankful for all the officers, sheriff's deputies, state troopers, law enforcement agents, firefighters and volunteers who helped search. However, McCall said law enforcement officials didn't always work well together. There were weekly conferences on Wednesday afternoons where representatives from Springfield police, the Greene County Sheriff's Office, the highway patrol and more would sit around a table. "I think sometimes they came and they didn't check their egos at the door," McCall said. She said she still believes the organizations haven't shared all their information about the three missing women with each other. McCall recalled how early in the investigation, the highway patrol volunteered to bring a "whole truckload of computers" down to help with the investigation, but the Springfield Police Department declined. Computers would have been much more effective at tracking information than the 3x5-inch note cards used by police, McCall said. McCall said she believes one day, she will know what happened to her daughter — if not in this life, then in the next. "Both my husband and I, we have a strong faith," she said. "For a while, we turned against God or we denied there could be God. If there was — why would he do something like this?" Eventually, McCall said she came to the conclusion that God gives people the ability to choose to do good or bad. "That person or persons — whoever did this — did it, not God," McCall said. (God is) the only one that knows what happened, other than the persons responsible." McCall said her faith was integral in coping with the disappearance early on, a time when she built a "metal box" around herself. "The first few weeks, I didn't eat at all. If I ate, (it was) two or three bites a day," she said. "I didn't sleep. I didn't eat. I was kinda going on power from God — that's all I can say." In one of the earliest stories about the three missing women, McCall told the News-Leader: "The shower is a great place to cry." Twenty-five years later, she said she still cries, though less often. McCall said if her daughter is somewhere alive, she wants her to know this: She still loves her no matter what has happened since her disappearance. Wednesday, there will be a candlelight vigil for the three missing women in Phelps Grove Park at 7 p.m., McCall said. Everyone is welcome to come, she said. "It's going to be a positive thing," McCall said. "It's going to be a celebration of their lives."
  10. http://www.news-leader.com/story/news/local/ozarks/2017/06/01/mother-missing-woman-dont-call-anniversary/351482001/ Mother of missing woman: Don't call it an anniversary Giacomo Bologna , GBOLOGNA@NEWS-LEADER.COM Published 11:15 p.m. CT May 31, 2017 | Updated 11:17 p.m. CT May 31, 2017 Standing in that bedroom on June 7, 1992, Janis McCall had no way of knowing her daughter would become part of Springfield's most puzzling unsolved disappearance. Instead, McCall was angry. Her daughter Stacy had just graduated from Kickapoo and was spending the night at a friend's home, but when Stacy didn't call her the next day, McCall went over to the central Springfield home. The doors were unlocked. And inside a room were Stacy McCall's shorts, shoes and bra in a neat pile on the floor next to the bed. Nearby were her keys, her bathing suit, her purse and her make-up kit. "I thought, 'This is absolutely stupid' — that she left her stuff here and she left her car and she didn't have any sense to call me," McCall said. Stacy was a beautiful, vibrant girl, McCall said. She used to model wedding dresses, and her long hair reached past her waist. Even now, when McCall sees a girl with hair that long, she has to get a glimpse of the girl's face just to see that it's not Stacy. Why didn't she call? And why was her car still parked outside? "Her shirt and her panties were all that she had," McCall said. The TV in the bedroom was turned on, but only static was on the screen. McCall went outside to her daughter's car and realized — this doesn't make sense. In the ensuing days, one of the largest missing-person searches ever began in southwest Missouri. They were looking for Stacy McCall, 18, Suzanne "Suzie" Streeter, 19, and Streeter's mother, Sherrill Levitt, 47. Stacy McCall and Streeter had left the graduation party in Battlefield together. They went to the central Springfield home of Streeter's mother, Levitt. That's the last known place the three missing women were believed to have been. Within a week, divers from the fire department had scoured Lake Springfield, police officers on horseback had searched fields, and more than 20,000 flyers had been distributed across the area. The day after their disappearance, a captain with the Springfield Police Department said: "We think we're heading in the right direction ... Our hopes remain high to get that one clue or that one phone call that really gives you a break in the case." Nearly 25 years have passed, and that clue or phone call still hasn't come. McCall said she's felt as though the case was on the brink of being solved countless times, calling those feelings an "emotional roller coaster." "You're at the lowest low and then you go up and you're at the highest high and you think 'I'm gonna have her home tonight. I'm gonna have my baby home,'" she said. "Then within a few hours or a few days, you're back to the lowest low again." How many times has she ridden that roller coaster? "I can't even begin to tell you," McCall said. "Truly, I don't believe that they're alive; I think they're probably gone. I don't know why or when or how long they were kept alive. ... I would love to find them in white slavery somewhere or sold to a sheik over in Iraq." Next Wednesday will be the 25th marker — not anniversary, she said — of their disappearance. "Anniversaries are something people celebrate," she said, "and we don't celebrate when the three missing women disappeared." The last time McCall said she saw her daughter was June 6, 1992, around 8:30 p.m. The family had just eaten and was taking pictures outside before cutting Stacy's graduation cake, McCall said. Stacy wanted to go to a party and then head to a water park in Branson later that night, McCall said, but McCall had a "horrible feeling" her daughter would get into an accident if they drove to Branson at night. Stacy hugged her mom and told her she would call. "She didn't cut her cake that night," McCall said. "She was going to cut it the next day." Just two hours later, Stacy called. They weren't going to Branson. Instead, she would be staying the night at a friend's house and she would call her mother in the morning. However, a little after 2 a.m., Stacy and Suzie left the party and went to Suzie's home. "I didn't ever get that call in the morning," McCall said. McCall would get thousands of phone calls about her daughter — tips, crank calls, cruel jokes and more — but no call from her daughter. McCall said she still gets calls about the missing women. "We had people call us and tell us they put them in a vat, and some people said they'd all been frozen and cut up into pieces and put into a kiln." Even the most unlikely tip gets forwarded on to police, McCall said. For a while, she said, she and her husband paid an "ex-con" to search for their daughter. "He said he could get in places that the police couldn't," McCall said. "He led us up and down the garden path and took our money." McCall said she had even arranged through friends to have a helicopter ready in case her daughter needed to be immediately picked up somewhere. "I had a lot of people who were willing to help us," she said. "I think people would have done anything to help us find them." Sometimes people still recognize McCall as the mother of Stacy, McCall said, especially when she's out with one of her other two daughters. Often people tell her they're praying for her and her missing daughter, she said. "I love the community. I love Springfield," McCall said. "The people have been friendly." Looking back at the initial investigation, McCall said she is thankful for all the officers, sheriff's deputies, state troopers, law enforcement agents, firefighters and volunteers who helped search. However, McCall said law enforcement officials didn't always work well together. There were weekly conferences on Wednesday afternoons where representatives from Springfield police, the Greene County Sheriff's Office, the highway patrol and more would sit around a table. "I think sometimes they came and they didn't check their egos at the door," McCall said. She said she still believes the organizations haven't shared all their information about the three missing women with each other. McCall recalled how early in the investigation, the highway patrol volunteered to bring a "whole truckload of computers" down to help with the investigation, but the Springfield Police Department declined. Computers would have been much more effective at tracking information than the 3x5-inch note cards used by police, McCall said. McCall said she believes one day, she will know what happened to her daughter — if not in this life, then in the next. "Both my husband and I, we have a strong faith," she said. "For a while, we turned against God or we denied there could be God. If there was — why would he do something like this?" Eventually, McCall said she came to the conclusion that God gives people the ability to choose to do good or bad. "That person or persons — whoever did this — did it, not God," McCall said. (God is) the only one that knows what happened, other than the persons responsible." McCall said her faith was integral in coping with the disappearance early on, a time when she built a "metal box" around herself. "The first few weeks, I didn't eat at all. If I ate, (it was) two or three bites a day," she said. "I didn't sleep. I didn't eat. I was kinda going on power from God — that's all I can say." In one of the earliest stories about the three missing women, McCall told the News-Leader: "The shower is a great place to cry." Twenty-five years later, she said she still cries, though less often. McCall said if her daughter is somewhere alive, she wants her to know this: She still loves her no matter what has happened since her disappearance. Wednesday, there will be a candlelight vigil for the three missing women in Phelps Grove Park at 7 p.m., McCall said. Everyone is welcome to come, she said. "It's going to be a positive thing," McCall said. "It's going to be a celebration of their lives."
  11. http://www.news-leader.com/story/news/local/ozarks/2017/06/01/mother-missing-woman-dont-call-anniversary/351482001/ Mother of missing woman: Don't call it an anniversary Giacomo Bologna , GBOLOGNA@NEWS-LEADER.COM Published 11:15 p.m. CT May 31, 2017 | Updated 11:17 p.m. CT May 31, 2017 Standing in that bedroom on June 7, 1992, Janis McCall had no way of knowing her daughter would become part of Springfield's most puzzling unsolved disappearance. Instead, McCall was angry. Her daughter Stacy had just graduated from Kickapoo and was spending the night at a friend's home, but when Stacy didn't call her the next day, McCall went over to the central Springfield home. The doors were unlocked. And inside a room were Stacy McCall's shorts, shoes and bra in a neat pile on the floor next to the bed. Nearby were her keys, her bathing suit, her purse and her make-up kit. "I thought, 'This is absolutely stupid' — that she left her stuff here and she left her car and she didn't have any sense to call me," McCall said. Stacy was a beautiful, vibrant girl, McCall said. She used to model wedding dresses, and her long hair reached past her waist. Even now, when McCall sees a girl with hair that long, she has to get a glimpse of the girl's face just to see that it's not Stacy. Why didn't she call? And why was her car still parked outside? "Her shirt and her panties were all that she had," McCall said. The TV in the bedroom was turned on, but only static was on the screen. McCall went outside to her daughter's car and realized — this doesn't make sense. In the ensuing days, one of the largest missing-person searches ever began in southwest Missouri. They were looking for Stacy McCall, 18, Suzanne "Suzie" Streeter, 19, and Streeter's mother, Sherrill Levitt, 47. Stacy McCall and Streeter had left the graduation party in Battlefield together. They went to the central Springfield home of Streeter's mother, Levitt. That's the last known place the three missing women were believed to have been. Within a week, divers from the fire department had scoured Lake Springfield, police officers on horseback had searched fields, and more than 20,000 flyers had been distributed across the area. The day after their disappearance, a captain with the Springfield Police Department said: "We think we're heading in the right direction ... Our hopes remain high to get that one clue or that one phone call that really gives you a break in the case." Nearly 25 years have passed, and that clue or phone call still hasn't come. McCall said she's felt as though the case was on the brink of being solved countless times, calling those feelings an "emotional roller coaster." "You're at the lowest low and then you go up and you're at the highest high and you think 'I'm gonna have her home tonight. I'm gonna have my baby home,'" she said. "Then within a few hours or a few days, you're back to the lowest low again." How many times has she ridden that roller coaster? "I can't even begin to tell you," McCall said. "Truly, I don't believe that they're alive; I think they're probably gone. I don't know why or when or how long they were kept alive. ... I would love to find them in white slavery somewhere or sold to a sheik over in Iraq." Next Wednesday will be the 25th marker — not anniversary, she said — of their disappearance. "Anniversaries are something people celebrate," she said, "and we don't celebrate when the three missing women disappeared." The last time McCall said she saw her daughter was June 6, 1992, around 8:30 p.m. The family had just eaten and was taking pictures outside before cutting Stacy's graduation cake, McCall said. Stacy wanted to go to a party and then head to a water park in Branson later that night, McCall said, but McCall had a "horrible feeling" her daughter would get into an accident if they drove to Branson at night. Stacy hugged her mom and told her she would call. "She didn't cut her cake that night," McCall said. "She was going to cut it the next day." Just two hours later, Stacy called. They weren't going to Branson. Instead, she would be staying the night at a friend's house and she would call her mother in the morning. However, a little after 2 a.m., Stacy and Suzie left the party and went to Suzie's home. "I didn't ever get that call in the morning," McCall said. McCall would get thousands of phone calls about her daughter — tips, crank calls, cruel jokes and more — but no call from her daughter. McCall said she still gets calls about the missing women. "We had people call us and tell us they put them in a vat, and some people said they'd all been frozen and cut up into pieces and put into a kiln." Even the most unlikely tip gets forwarded on to police, McCall said. For a while, she said, she and her husband paid an "ex-con" to search for their daughter. "He said he could get in places that the police couldn't," McCall said. "He led us up and down the garden path and took our money." McCall said she had even arranged through friends to have a helicopter ready in case her daughter needed to be immediately picked up somewhere. "I had a lot of people who were willing to help us," she said. "I think people would have done anything to help us find them." Sometimes people still recognize McCall as the mother of Stacy, McCall said, especially when she's out with one of her other two daughters. Often people tell her they're praying for her and her missing daughter, she said. "I love the community. I love Springfield," McCall said. "The people have been friendly." Looking back at the initial investigation, McCall said she is thankful for all the officers, sheriff's deputies, state troopers, law enforcement agents, firefighters and volunteers who helped search. However, McCall said law enforcement officials didn't always work well together. There were weekly conferences on Wednesday afternoons where representatives from Springfield police, the Greene County Sheriff's Office, the highway patrol and more would sit around a table. "I think sometimes they came and they didn't check their egos at the door," McCall said. She said she still believes the organizations haven't shared all their information about the three missing women with each other. McCall recalled how early in the investigation, the highway patrol volunteered to bring a "whole truckload of computers" down to help with the investigation, but the Springfield Police Department declined. Computers would have been much more effective at tracking information than the 3x5-inch note cards used by police, McCall said. McCall said she believes one day, she will know what happened to her daughter — if not in this life, then in the next. "Both my husband and I, we have a strong faith," she said. "For a while, we turned against God or we denied there could be God. If there was — why would he do something like this?" Eventually, McCall said she came to the conclusion that God gives people the ability to choose to do good or bad. "That person or persons — whoever did this — did it, not God," McCall said. (God is) the only one that knows what happened, other than the persons responsible." McCall said her faith was integral in coping with the disappearance early on, a time when she built a "metal box" around herself. "The first few weeks, I didn't eat at all. If I ate, (it was) two or three bites a day," she said. "I didn't sleep. I didn't eat. I was kinda going on power from God — that's all I can say." In one of the earliest stories about the three missing women, McCall told the News-Leader: "The shower is a great place to cry." Twenty-five years later, she said she still cries, though less often. McCall said if her daughter is somewhere alive, she wants her to know this: She still loves her no matter what has happened since her disappearance. Wednesday, there will be a candlelight vigil for the three missing women in Phelps Grove Park at 7 p.m., McCall said. Everyone is welcome to come, she said. "It's going to be a positive thing," McCall said. "It's going to be a celebration of their lives."
  12. Hello Kelly,

    this is christina Weinhammer.  My brother, Steven is missing again.  I tried to send in the missing sheet, however the put in dates for birthday and missing date do not work there for it won't let me send the form in. Can you help?

    thank you, Christina 

  13. http://whmi.com/news/article/27718 Saturday Marks 8 Year Anniversary Of Fenton Woman's Mysterious Disappearance February 10, 2017 While the strange disappearance of a Fenton woman eight years ago is technically a cold case, police and family members are holding onto hope. Then 42-year-old Randa Jawhari vanished from her apartment complex on Shiawassee Avenue near US-23 on February 11th, 2009. Police were left with no signs of foul play or other clues as to where she may have gone. Randa, who had been diagnosed with mental illness, didn’t own a car, driver’s license or credit card. Fenton Police Chief Rick Aro tells WHMI his update is very similar to last year unfortunately but they continue to look at everything and follow up on every lead received. He says these cold cases can be very frustrating because they would like to get some closure for the family and find out what happened but there are some small pieces of information they need to make that happen and they just haven’t found them yet. While now considered a cold case, he says that doesn’t mean they’ve given up hope of solving it. He says Mr. Jawhari passed away but they still have contact with Mrs. Jawhari as well as Randa’s brother and sisters on a fairly regular basis. Aro says they will do everything they can to get the family some closure and he hopes it happens, noting they still receive tips from time to time, just not as many as in the beginning. Police have long said they believe there are one or two people out there who know something that could really open up the case and provide the tips they need to solve it. A person of interest was identified early on in the case, described as an associate of Jawhari’s who would transport her to different appointments. Detective Scott Townsend is in charge of the case and Aro says anyone with information can also contact Crime Stoppers at 1-800-SPEAK-UP. There is still a reward being offered and the information is passed along anonymously.
  14. http://www.nbcnews.com/feature/cold-case-spotlight/more-questions-answers-nearly-42-years-after-washington-teen-vanishes-n688811 More Questions than Answers Nearly 42 Years after Washington Teen Vanishes Cold Case Spotlight Nov 27 2016, 4:58 pm ET by Rachael Trost When you read about Laurie Partridge's case, you're left with more questions than answers. Laurie was the oldest of six children, was on her high school's drill team, wrote for the school newspaper, and was hoping to marry her high school sweetheart soon. But on December 4, 1974, Laurie disappeared. "Laurie was such a beautiful, beautiful person," Laurie's younger sister Kimberly Partridge Carroll told NBC affiliate KHQ in 2010. "Whoever took her changed the whole course of our lives." Laurie, 17 at the time, had left her classes at Ferris High School in Spokane, Washington around noon that day, telling friends and teachers she was suffering from menstrual cramps She did not have a car, or anyone to give her a ride at that time, so she headed out on foot to walk the two or so miles home. Her family had just recently moved to the area from Fountain Valley, California. Family members reportedly knew something was wrong when the blonde, blue-eyed teen failed to show for her shift at the Lincoln Heights Theater. After contacting her boyfriend and several friends, they called police to report her missing. Laurie's father had bought her two general admission tickets to a Beach Boys concert for later that week at the Spokane Coliseum. Family members said there was no way she'd miss the concert, so police went to see if they could spot her there. But she did not show up. Her tickets, however, had been used. Authorities were never able to uncover if it was Laurie or someone else who used them. Laurie's loved ones were insistent that she would never leave on her own. She had just become engaged to her 20-year-old boyfriend, and the two had planned to go pick out an engagement ring. She was settling into her new life in Washington and was looking forward to her future, according to newspaper reports from the time. Investigators questioned several people over the years in connection with Laurie's disappearance, but no charges have ever been filed. Laurie's boyfriend was extensively investigated, but was never named a suspect in the case. The notorious serial killer Ted Bundy was even interviewed, but was ruled out at as he was in Utah at the time of Laurie's disappearance. In 2011, detectives announced they had a new witness who said he had seen Laurie several hours after she left to walk home talking to a white male in his 40s or 50s near a white truck with a van backend and a dark door. Despite the new possible lead, Laurie's case remains unsolved. Laurie's siblings are now dotted throughout the country. Her parents divorced, but then remarried several years later. Her mother passed away in 2004, without any answers as to what happened to her oldest daughter. "It's torture not knowing," Laurie's sister Kimberly told NBC affiliate KHQ. "It's absolute torture." If you have any information regarding Laurie's case, please call the Spokane Crime Check at (509) 456-2233. For more information, you can visit the Facebook page 'Laurie Partridge Missing from Spokane, WA' or the website lauriepartridgemissing.weebly.com.
  15. http://www.cullmantimes.com/news/tabitha-franklin-case-leads-local-investigators-to-illinois/article_a9d6c466-a3a0-11e6-bf2e-fb556c880f84.html Tabitha Franklin case leads local investigators to Illinois David Palmer 11/5/2016 Investigators with the Cullman County Sheriff's Office were in Illinois last week questioning several people of interest in the case of Tabitha Franklin, who has been missing since 2009. Franklin, 28, was last seen on Aug. 13, 2009, at a residence in West Point. "We were following up on some information in regards to a person of interest in the case," said Cullman County Sheriff Matt Gentry. "This person was questioned in 2009 and fled the area after questioning. We questioned multiple individuals while we were in Illinois. Even though this case started in 2009, it's still a priority. With it being an ongoing investigation we can't release details on the information at this time." WREX in Rockford, Illinois, reported the Winnebago County Sheriff's Office has been working with Cullman County investigators in the case. Numerous searches have been conducted over the past seven years, but Franklin has never been found. Family and friends of Franklin held a candlelight vigil in August and asked for anyone with information to contact authorities. Gentry said new information into the investigation of Franklin’s disappearance led local investigators to reach out to Winnebago County for assistance. Anyone with information about Tabitha Franklin's disappearance is asked to contact the Cullman County Sheriff’s Department, 256-734-0342. In Rockford, the sheriff's number is 815-319-6400.