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Missing Man: Clinton Nelson - LA - 09/01/2006

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A Press Release put out by the family of Clinton Nelson:

Mothers Question if Two Bossier Parish Missing Person Cases are Related

Carolyn Johnson, mother of Clinton Nelson (21 at the age of his disappearance) who went missing from the Bossier Parish on 9/1/2006 and Kay Kuriger, mother of Gregory Alonzo Vice Jr. who went missing from the Bossier Parish on 3/21/2000 (23 at the age of his disappearance) are questioning if there is some connection between the disappearances of the two men. Both young men went missing in the early evening hours.  Both men lived in the Haughton area. There have been tips that have come in on both cases indicating there is foul play in both of the men's cases.  Neither of the men have been found and both cases have gone cold.

Carolyn Johnson located information about Gregory Alonzo Vice Jr's case after doing some research on the internet shortly after her son Clinton Nelson went missing from the Princeton Louisiana area. "I was saddened and frightened to hear about another young male that had been missing for about 7 years when I first came across information about his disappearance. I immediately starting researching his case but I was only able to find limited information."  Since Carolyn was unable to find information about Gregory's case she spoke to the detectives at the Bossier Sheriff's office as they were listed as the investigative agency in both cases. "Unfortunately I was told that they would have to look into the case because the detective was not familiar with the case. Later I was told it is unlikely the two cases are connected, but anything is possible.  Eventually I was able to speak to a long time friend of Gregory's who was able to put me in touch with Kay. We were able to compare notes and starting questioning if there could be a connection."

On April 1, 2008 Sheriff Deen wrote an article which was published in the Shreveport Times (http://www.nwlanews.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=8190&Itemid=29).  The title of the article is "Justice isn't served until victims are". The article was a tribute to National Crime Victims Week (April 13-19, 2008).

In the article Sherriff Deen said "Justice is served when all crime victims are treated with dignity and compassion by our criminal and juvenile justice systems.  Justice is served when crime victims' most basic needs are identified and efforts are made to meet those important needs.  Justice is served when crime victims are informed of all their rights throughout the justice process; rights that empower them, give them important choices and offer them opportunities to have voices and choices in their cases and in their future." Carolyn Johnson and Kay Kruiger are trying to be the voices for the son's that are missing and probably victims of foul play.  We are asking that they not be forgotten and that the sheriff's department help to get justice for the young men and their families. Clinton and Gregory may have been forgotten by some, but will never be forgotten by their mother's, family, and friends.

"Ultimately, I don't know if the two cases are related, but it does matter that neither of the cases have been solved."said Carolyn Johnson.  Kay Kuriger said, "I pray that one day our sons will be found, so that we may have closure."

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New photo provided by the family:

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Project Jason announces the featured missing persons in the August 2009 issue of the CDLJobs.com Online Magazine, which can be viewed at http://www.cdljobs.com/cdljobsonlinemagazine/AUG09.htm  This month's ad is on page 10. The site receives thousands of visitors per day.

Each month, CDLJobs.com publishes a full color ad in their popular online magazine which will feature 5-6 of Project Jason’s missing person cases from across the country. The ad has clickable links which take the reader to additional information about the missing person, and a link to their printable poster.  Readers are encouraged to sign up for the AAN program and help with poster distribution. “You can be a Hero” is the theme of the joint venture.

Awareness Angels Network (AAN). AAN, begun by Project Jason in 2008, provides a way for the public to assist the families of missing persons. Missing persons posters designed specifically for the AAN program are disseminated via email to those enrolled in the program. Participants can then upload the posters to websites, print and place the posters in public areas, and forward them to their contacts. The program helps spread the word and increase the chances of finding the person.

In the August issue, the following missing persons were featured:

Michael Austin Davis, missing from Jacksonville, FL since 6/25/2007:

http://projectjason.org/forums/index.php?topic=1174.0

Sabrina Kahler, missing from Erie, PA since 6/24/2002:

http://projectjason.org/forums/index.php?topic=5930

Clinton Nelson, missing from Princeton, LA since 9/1/2006:

http://www.projectjason.org/forums/index.php?topic=702.0

Elsha Rivera, missing from Ft. Worth, TX since 9/1/2004:

http://www.projectjason.org/forums/index.php?topic=558.0

Jesse Ross, missing from Chicago, IL since 11/21/2006:

http://www.projectjason.org/forums/index.php?topic=729.0

Jerry Tang, missing from San Francisco, CA since 11/29/2005:

http://www.projectjason.org/forums/index.php?topic=660.0

You can read more about this program at http://projectjason.org/forums/index.php?topic=6319.0

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http://www.shreveporttimes.com/article/20090820/NEWS03/908200313

National tour to revive missing person cases

August 20, 2009

By Loresha Wilson

Carolyn Johnson is hoping to find her son, Clinton Nelson, alive; however, she fears the worst.

With a lack of evidence in his disappearance, the South Dakota woman knows her son could be dead and foul play could be involved. Nelson, who was 21 at the time, was last seen Sept. 1, 2006, visiting friends at a Princeton house.

Johnson has spent restless nights searching for Nelson, and she wonders whether he knows he has a 2-year-old son, Austin Clark  born two months after his dad's disappearance.

"Austin is by far what has kept me going and what has given me the strength to keep looking for my son and find out what happened to him," Johnson said. "Austin is a spitting image of him. He acts like him, talks like him and looks just like him.

"Nelson disappeared and never saw his son, and I believe people are forgetting about my son."

The CUE Center for Missing Persons, a non-profit organization that aims to find the missing and support their families, will be in Bossier City today to raise awareness about Nelson and other missing persons' cases in Louisiana. The Wilmington, North Carolina-based center will attend a rally and distribute DVDs and information concerning missing, unidentified people and unsolved homicide cases that have gone cold.

The rally is hosted by Johnson's family and relatives of Gregory Vice Jr. and Michael Pierce, whose missing body was recovered.

Vice last was seen March 21, 2000, leaving a house in south Bossier Parish after his truck broke down. In December 2007, Bossier firefighters found Pierce's skeletal remains inside his Jeep Comanche, which was recovered from the Red River. He'd been missing five years.

The CUE Center supported Pierce's family during the time he was missing. Each year the caravan of volunteers conducts the "Road to Remember Tour" to shed light on missing person cases.

"After so many years, these cases fade from the public's radar, but for the families and friends of the missing, the nightmare continues," CUE Founder Monica Caison said in a prepared statement. "We are traveling across the country to make sure no case fades from memory ... in an effort to remind everyone these featured cases need a resolution for their families."

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http://www.shreveporttimes.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/200908210600/NEWS03/908210317

Pain, questions unite relatives of missing persons

By Kelsey McKinney •  August 21, 2009

Family members of missing persons gathered Thursday under tents outside the Bossier Civic Center for the CUE Center's On the Road to Remember tour stop in hopes of locating their loved ones.

"This is how we become a family," Judy Downes said of the event during which they communed with others in the same boat and shared stories of their missing loved ones.

After being disappointed with local law enforcement's efforts to located her grandson Michael Pierce, Downes was put in touch with the Community United Effort Center, a nonproft Monica Caison founded about 16 years ago.

"CUE picks up where law enforcement leaves off," states a CUE handout.

With help from the center, Pierce's skeletal remains were found in his Jeep in the Red River in December 2007, five years after he went missing.

"I saw a gap between the time a person is reported missing and the time of recovery, and that gap needed to be filled," Caison explained. She works to provide emotional support for family members and organize efforts to quickly disseminate information about missing persons.

"The only peace it brought me was not having to wonder where he is," Downes said of her grandson as she pointed to the sky. "I'm just hoping these families have a better result."

Downes was referring to relatives of missing persons Clinton Nelson, Gregory Vice Jr. and Beverly Meadows who also attended the tour stop Thursday.

The Cue Center represents a meld of people whose cases started with a missing persons report -- some are still missing, some are resolved after a body is found, and others, with or without a body, are the subject of unsolved homicide cases.

The families are "stuck in this limbo of not knowing anything," said Vice's mother, Kay Kuriger, 51, of Florida.

Vice last was seen March 21, 2000, leaving a house in south Bossier Parish after his truck broke down. His body never has been recovered, but he is the subject of a homicide case that went cold due to lack of evidence, Kuriger said.

"I think it's going to make some people nervous in town who didn't speak up 9½ years ago," Kuriger said of the event Thursday. "I know people know."

Finding her son's body could provide the evidence needed to pursue criminal charges, she believes.

Shreveporter Liz Lindenfelter said she regularly calls hospitals in an attempt to locate her missing daughter.

The 66-year-old said she spoke with daughter Beverly Meadows by phone Dec. 26 but could not reach her when she tried to call again later that evening. Lindenfelter believes her daughter, a 48-year-old with diabetes and other medical problems, wandered from the Marshall, Texas, nursing home where she lived and somehow died in the woods nearby.

Clinton Nelson's mother, Carolyn Johnson, said she too fears the worst but can't keep from hoping her son will be found alive. He was 21 when he went missing Sept. 1, 2006, while visiting a friend in Princeton in Bossier Parish, said Johnson, of South Dakota.

"After so many years, these cases fade from the public's radar," CUE founder Monica Caison says in a prepared statement. "But for the families and friends of the missing, the nightmare continues.

"We are traveling across the country to make sure no case fades from memory ... in an effort to remind everyone these featured cases need a resolution for their families."

The tour will feature 104 cases on its 23 stops through seven states covering about 4,800 miles.

Volunteers released 104 sky blue balloons, one for each missing person featured on the center's sixth annuall cross-country tour, before they left Bossier City for their next stop -- Balmorhea, Texas. Several family members gazed up into the sky and wiped away tears, some apologizing for the unexpected emotions it triggered.

Finding her son's body could provide the evidence needed to pursue criminal charges, she believes.

Shreveporter Liz Lindenfelter said she regularly calls hospitals in an attempt to locate her missing daughter.

The 66-year-old said she spoke with daughter Beverly Meadows by phone Dec. 26 but could not reach her when she tried to call again later that evening. Lindenfelter believes her daughter, a 48-year-old with diabetes and other medical problems, wandered from the Marshall, Texas, nursing home where she lived and somehow died in the woods nearby.

Clinton Nelson's mother, Carolyn Johnson, said she too fears the worst but can't keep from hoping her son will be found alive. He was 21 when he went missing Sept. 1, 2006, while visiting a friend in Princeton in Bossier Parish, said Johnson, of South Dakota.

"After so many years, these cases fade from the public's radar," CUE founder Monica Caison says in a prepared statement. "But for the families and friends of the missing, the nightmare continues.

"We are traveling across the country to make sure no case fades from memory ... in an effort to remind everyone these featured cases need a resolution for their families."

The tour will feature 104 cases on its 23 stops through seven states covering about 4,800 miles.

Volunteers released 104 sky blue balloons, one for each missing person featured on the center's sixth annuall cross-country tour, before they left Bossier City for their next stop -- Balmorhea, Texas. Several family members gazed up into the sky and wiped away tears, some apologizing for the unexpected emotions it triggered.

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http://www.nwlanews.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=15608&Itemid=56

Families meet to remember the missing        

Written by Sean Green      Friday, 21 August 2009  

CUE hosts tour to raise awareness of missing persons throughout the U.S.

Two-hundred and thirty-eight pennies and counting. Two hundred and thirty-eight pennies is a physical reminder to Liz Lingenfelter that her daughter is missing.

"Your heart hurts everyday. You never have peace," said Lingenfelter.

Lingenfelter picks up a penny once a day and stores it in a jar to alleviate the pain of not knowing where her daughter, Beverly Meadows, is. She has been looking for Beverly since Dec. 26 when she went missing from a nursing home in Marshall, Texas.

Lingenfelter and Beverly's story was just one of the several from families of local missing persons who gathered outside the Bossier Civic Center Thursday afternoon to bring attention to and remember their loved ones. The event was part of the Community United Effort (CUE) Center for Missing Persons sixth annual “On the Road to Remember" Nationwide Tour.

Volunteers from the North Carolina-based organization are traveling across the U.S. to raise awareness of missing children and adults and will be distributing a trail of DVDs, press kits and valuable information throughout the path of the tour - concerning those missing, unidentified person's and unsolved homicide cases that have gone cold.

“After so many years, these cases fade from the public's radar, but for the families and friends of the missing, the nightmare continues every minute of every day their loved one is missing," said Monica Caison, CUE founder.

“We are traveling across the country to make sure no case fades from memory and will come to Florence, in an effort to remind everyone of these featured cases need a resolution for their families, they need our help and the community's help to bring them home", she added.

The families of missing Clinton Nelson and Gregory Vice Jr. and recovered Michael Pierce sponsored the event that included a balloon launch to symbolize missing persons, a presentation to law enforcement for their efforts in finding Pierce and a candle light vigil.

Families from Shreveport-Bossier, surrounding areas and the whole state gathered with tents featuring pictures of their missing loved ones and distributed fliers to try and spread the word about them.

Despite the families were gathered together under such a dark cloud, Gregory Vice's mother, Kay Kruiger, is glad to be able to talk with other grieving families and offer support.

"I hate to see other people going through the same thing I'm going through, but I'm glad that we were all able to get together for the support. If nothing else, if one case were to get solved from this, it would be a great honor," she said.

Her son was last seen March 21, 2000. The story of his disappearance began when his truck broke down while traveling from Princeton to Taylor Town. Vice then got a ride to his friend's house and the pair got into an argument and Vice was reportedly last seen walking in the rain from his friend's house.

The time has not softened the blow for Kuriger.

"You still hold on to that hope that one day that phone is going to ring and that he's been hiding somewhere and he's coming out of hiding. My mind has even gone into that he's been put into a witness protection program. Even though logically you know that he's not going to be found alive, you still hold on to that hope he will be," said Kruiger.

She said the Bossier Sheriff's Office has not been helpful from the start, being both rude and incommunicative.

"I was living in Florida at the time and when I called them, they said, 'You know, it has to do with drugs,' but I don't know how they could know that if they don't know what the case was about. And I was even told that the perfect murder had been committed," said Kruiger.

Despite facing a miniscule chance that Gregory will be found alive, Kruiger pledged to never stop.

"I will never stop, not until I have him back or (I find) his body. I can't," she said.

Carolyn Johnson, mother of Clinton Nelson, was on hand to spread the word about her son who disappeared Sept. 1, 2006. Nelson vanished after moving to the area from South Dakota in April 2006. He disappeared while walking home from a friend's house after a party.

"It's excruciating, it is by far the worst experience I've ever been through. It's been explained to me that when you have someone who dies, you're allowed to go through the grieving process, but when you have a missing person, you go through that process over and over again every time there's a new lead that comes in," said Johnson.

The family has been led to believe that it was accidental but asked that if it was malicious, that anyone with information would come forth so they can finally have some resolution.

"There's so many people here who have been through this experience. We want others to know we're here and we know what we're going through but also that this can happen to anybody," said Johnson.

Matt Pierce described his brother, Michael, as a nice person and a "big teddy bear."

Michael went missing in 2002 and his remains were found in the Red River five years after the disappearance.

Pierce said his brother vanished after a coworker's husband became suspicious of an affair and the family believes the husband is responsible for Pierce's death. The husband was later convicted for killing his wife and unborn child after a dispute, but there was not enough proof to charge him with Michael's death.

Despite the fact his brother was not found alive, Matt said it gives him a sense of peace to know where his brother is.

"It's real important to go see him at the grave. It would've been better to see him alive, but to go see him and know where he is means everything," said Pierce.

Not having that peace of mind is what causes Lingenfelter to use the pennies. It comes from a family joke where her daughter would drop pennies in Lingenfelter's path to make her pick them up.

"Beverly would have a chance to laugh when she left the pennies laying in my path and I would have a chance to laugh when I found the pennies. Little things mean a lot," said Lingenfelter. "Today and every day when I bend down to pick up a penny, I may have tears in my eyes, but in my heart I know that Beverly has left them there and I know she is thinking about me no matter where she may be," she said.

While the chances of finding her daughter alive dwindles every day, Lingenfelter hopes that she's still out there - maybe she in a hospital. She calls the local police department every week and has even driven 497 miles in a day to canvass the area, look in hospitals and talk to police departments.

"I've looked everywhere. I've been in ditches, the woods, abandoned houses," said Lingenfelter.

She said that while she holds out hope against all hope, she is grateful for CUE offering her the opportunity to spread the word.

"I think what they're doing is wonderful. To be out here and see everyone and talk with them, you just don't know what it's like until it's happened to you," said Lingenfelter.

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http://www.amw.com/missing_persons/case.cfm?id=67823

Oil Field Worker Disappears Without A Trace

Clinton was wearing a black t-shirt and jeans when he was last seen.

On Sept. 1, 2006, 21-year-old Clinton Nelson walked out of his friend's home in Haughton, La. and never returned.

He was staying there over Labor Day weekend, and friends thought he was just stepping out for a cigarette.

Since then cops have heard a number of theories and rumors, but years later no one seems to really know what happened to Clinton.

Det. Charles Owens of the Bossier County Sheriff's Office said he doesn't believe Clinton had any reason to leave, willingly.

He had a $2,000 uncashed check waiting for him at his father's house, about nine miles away, and was very close with his mother, Carolyn Johnson.

She described Clinton as a compassionate person who loved to make other people laugh and cared deeply for his family.

"Family and friends were everything to Clinton," Carolyn said. "Especially his sisters. Clinton was the kind of person that never missed a birthday or holiday. He always called and if he had the money he would send a card or present."

Clinton had recently moved to Louisiana, where his father lived, from South Dakota to take a job in the oil fields.

An injury on the job had forced him to take some time off.

Cops say Clinton had stitches in his collarbone, fractured ribs and a broken arm when he disappeared.

Clinton has not been seen since he left a friends home in Louisiana.

The home where Clinton was last seen is located in Haughton, La., a sparsely populated, rural area.

Police say the home is near a main road, U.S. Route 80, but behind it are several hundred wooded acres.

The last phone call Clinton made was to his father, claiming someone was after him. After that, cops say the phone went dead.

Clinton was wearing a black t-shirt, jeans, a black knit cap and tennis shoes the last time he was seen.

He also has a fresh scar on his collarbone.

Just after his move to Louisiana, Clinton cut his long hair very short.

Extensive searches of the area where he was last seen haven't turned up any clues.

The most recent search, in August 2009, sent a 22-man underwater search team into a nearby pond, but they found nothing.

"He loved to make his sister, Tarah, his cousins, step-dad and I laugh. I think that's the thing I miss most about him," Carolyn said.

"Clinton was not afraid to say, 'I love you' and he would fight with everything he had to protect his friends and family."

If you know anything about Clinton's disappearance, please call our hotline at 1-800-CRIME-TV.

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Clinton Nelson was among the featured people for September in The Garden for the Missing/Project Jason advertising program within Second Life. The posters are showcased at one of the highest traffic areas in the 3D virtual world, with 45,000 daily visitors from the U.S. and abroad.

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These advertisements are purchased by The Garden for the Missing http://www.gardenforthemissing.org/. More information about our efforts in Second Life is available at http://www.projectjason.org/SecondLife.html

Each person’s information is displayed for two weeks, then another person’s poster appears. The posters are provided by Project Jason’s Awareness Angels Network -- http://www.projectjason.org/awareness.html   

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http://www.ksla.com/Global/story.asp?S=14022915

Still Missing: Clinton Nelson's case gains national attention

Posted: Feb 14, 2011 12:09 AM CST Updated: Feb 14, 2011 12:09 AM CST

Bossier City, LA(KSLA) - Cable news channels are still taking notice of the case, five years after a young Bossier Parish man went missing.

21-year old Clinton Nelson disappeared back on September 1st of 2006 . His mother says Nelson had come down from South Dakota to work on an oil rig in Texas.

He vanished 3-months after his arrival while staying with his father in Princeton, Louisiana. His father told KSLA News 12 during a search in 2008 that he wouldn't give up hope.

Now, his disappearance may be gaining more national attention, but the few neighbors left that remember what happened, haven't stopped hoping for a conclusion, any conclusion. His family hasn't given up hope and still looking for clues.

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Be sure to watch Clinton's story on the Disappeared show on Discovery ID on March 5, 2012. Please check your local listing for the channel and time.

Disappeared 
Into the Bayou 
 



Clinton Nelson heads off to Louisiana to get to know his biological father and take a job in the oilfields. The 20 year-old is looking for a fresh start. But 6 months later, the bayou is combed for traces of a man who had been facing enormous pressure.

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http://www.ksla.com/story/17079217/6-yr-old-haughton-missing-man-case-profiled-on-national-tv-show

Missing Haughton man's case profiled on national TV

Posted: Mar 05, 2012 8:20 AM EST

Updated: March 5, 2012 07:20 AM CST

Alisa Thomas

KSLA NEWS 12

HAUGHTON, LA (KSLA) -A six-year-old Ark-La-Tex missing person case is set to be spotlighted nationally Monday night.

Clinton Nelson of Haughton, Louisiana was reportedly last seen in 2006.

In 2010, Bossier Parish authorities polygraph more than 10 people in connection to the case, but no arrest was made.

Nelson's family says his story will appear on ‘Disappeared' at 9 p.m. on the Investigation Discovery Channel.

Nelson's case has gained national attention before, airing on "Nancy Grace: America's Missing".

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http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/05/08/missing-persons-family-react-amanda-berry_n_3237247.html

 

Missing Persons' Family Members React To Rescue Of Amanda Berry, Gina DeJesus, Michelle Knight

Posted: 05/08/2013 11:15 am EDT  |  Updated: 05/08/2013 5:07 pm EDT

Andy Campbell

Michael McLaughlin

 

The three women rescued on Monday had been held captive as long as 10 years. For families of others still missing, the news evokes mixed feelings.

 

"It's so great that their families have some answers. It's just hard, for other parents, knowing their children are still gone," Carolyn Johnson of Louisiana told HuffPost Crime.

 

"But this will give people new hope, and that's what they need -- hope."

 

Johnson wept as she spoke of her son, Clinton Nelson, who vanished on Sept. 1, 2006, when he was 21.

 

Johnson said the rescue of Amanda Berry, Gina DeJesus, and Michelle Knight in Cleveland is what the friends and family of every missing person wants.

 

Still, for some, the news tears open a scab -- a reminder that their loved one is still lost.

 

Johnson joins many parents, friends and family members of missing people who have been watching horrifying new details emerge about the rescued girls' confinement.

 

Starr Lara was 14 when her sister, Jamie Grissim, went missing in 1971.

 

On Monday, one of her co-workers told her about the Cleveland rescue in an attempt to cheer her up.

 

"The biggest thing with me is people approach me as though my sister is alive. I know she isn't. It's upsetting to me," Lara told HuffPost Crime. "I'm happy [the rescue] gives people hope or they think that it gives me hope, but it's really hard on me. I know in my heart what happened."

 

Lara said she hasn't given up finding her sister -- but she expects to find her sister's remains.

 

Grissim was 16 when she disappeared after school in Vancouver, Wash. Her purse, ID and possessions were found May, 1972 in the woods northeast of Vancouver, near where other homicide victims had been found.

 

Lia Howard -- whose 14-year-old nephew, Dylan Redwine, went missing in Colorado on Nov. 12, 2012 -- says the Cleveland case has rejuvenated her family in its quest to find her nephew.

 

"It shows that missing children can be found even years later," she said Tuesday in a phone interview. "When you don't know where somebody is you put his name out there, because you never know where that someone is."

 

The National Center for Missing and Exploited Children also released a statement of hope, noting that recoveries of missing children are growing:

NCMEC has seen a growing number of recoveries of long-term missing children. Every story we hear offers hope to the families who are still searching, that their own children will one day come home.

 

On May 7, the NCMEC is celebrating this important message of hope by honoring Jaycee Dugard and her family at the 2013 Hope Awards. They were reunited in 2009 after Jaycee was abducted 18 years before.

 

This story like those of Elizabeth Smart, recovered after 9 months; Shawn Hornbeck, recovered after 4 years; Carlina White, recovered after 23 years; and Steve Carter, recovered after 34 years is the reason why we never forget any missing child.

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http://www.ksla.com/story/29099479/what-happened-to-clinton-nelson-8-years-later-family-still-searching

What happened to Clinton Nelson? 8 years later, family still searching

Posted: May 19, 2015 4:54 AM PST
Updated: May 19, 2015 5:06 PM PST

PRINCETON, LA (KSLA) -

A mother will not stop searching for answers in her son's disappearance more than 8 years ago.

Nearly nine years after her son went missing, a mother returns to Louisiana, still searching for answers.

"My goal has never been to see anyone get arrested or go to jail or any of that stuff, my goal is to bring my son home and to be able to give him a proper burial," said Carolyn Johnson, Nelson's mother.

It has been nearly 9 years now and Carolyn Johnson still does not know what happened to her son Clinton Nelson, who mysteriously went missing in 2006.

"It's been a long search and it's time to bring him home. It's time to find out what happened, where he's at. He's got a son, he's got a family that misses him desperately," said Johnson.

21-year-old Clinton Nelson had only been in Louisiana for 3 months when he disappeared in September 2006. His mother says he had moved from South Dakota to Princeton, LA to stay with his father while working on an oil rig in Texas.

He was last seen around 8:30 p.m. September 1, 2006 leaving a friend's residence on foot around Ward Lane and Highway 80.

"He was at a party over Labor Day weekend, he was on a break from work. There's been some varying stories. All we know is he was at this party and he supposedly left. Some say that he took off running, some say he got into a car and left with someone else. There's just been several different things come up," said Johnson.

His family has worked to keep his story alive in hopes of finally getting some answers, making appeals to the public over the years in various ways.

His case has even received national attention, but no arrests have been made.

Johnson has returned to the ArkLaTex once again for another push, meeting with Bossier Parish Sheriff's Office detectives Monday and planning another appeal to the public for information.

It has been about five years since Johnson last visited Louisiana, she came to talk with detectives and pass out more fliers.

"This has been one of those cases, even since the beginning that's been a true mystery for what happened," said Bill Davis, with the Bossier Parish Sheriff's Office.

The past nine years have not been easy for Nelson's family. He never got to meet his son, born a month and a half after he went missing.

Now 8-years-old, the boy has only been able to read about his dad.

"He's seen that somebody said he was eaten by alligators. How do you explain that to a child," said Johnson.

And Johnson will not stop looking for answers.

"I don't want people to forget about my son. He deserves better than that," said Johnson.

Johnson has also set up a Facebook page about her son's disappearance.

"Like the Bossier Doe case, this is another cold case that the Bossier Sheriff's Office could sure use the public's help in solving," said Lt. Bill Davis in a release Monday afternoon. "What happed to Clinton Nelson?"

There is a reward of up to $20,000 being offered.

Anyone with information about Nelson's whereabouts or disappearance is urged to contact the Bossier Parish Sheriff's Office or Crime Stoppers at (318) 424-4100.

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Clinton is still missing. New leads are needed.

 

Bossier Sheriff's Office
Phone: (318) 965-2203
Investigative Case #: 06-4835

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http://www.ksla.com/story/32942116/a-decade-later-missing-bossier-mans-family-still-looking-for-closure#.V8dKtmBsqnY.facebook

A decade later, missing Bossier man's family still looking for closure

Wednesday, August 31st 2016, 1:41 pm PDT
Wednesday, August 31st 2016, 1:55 pm PDT
By KSLA Staff

BOSSIER PARISH, LA (KSLA) -

A decade later, a family still is searching for an answer as to what happened to one of their loved ones.

linton Devon Nelson's disappearance from Princeton.

Last year, Nelson's mother traveled here from South Dakota to place flyers throughout the Bossier Parish area.

Carolyn Johnson's goal was and continues to be to keep alive hope of learning what became of her son.

Authorities and Nelson's family members believe he is dead. His family has offered a reward for the recovery of his remains.

A posting Aug. 25 on a Facebook page about Nelson sums up his family's continued anguish.

"Crazy this is from 2011. Clinton disappeared in 2006. I am not convinced that Larry was involved but I am convinced that several at the party were! September 1st marks 10 years!!!!! Yes I said that right, 10 years of life my son has missed out on. 10 years of pain his family has suffered through! 10 years of no answers. If this is not scary to you, it should be! If it can happen to us, it can happen to anyone!"

 

The story of Nelson's disappearance has received national attention, yet there has been no arrest in the case. 

 

"There is someone out there who has the missing piece to the puzzle," Bossier sheriff's office spokesman Josh Cagle said. 

At the time of his disappearance, Nelson was living with his father in Haughton and working on an oil rig. He last was seen about 8:30 p.m. Sept. 1, 2006, leaving a party at a friend's residence near U.S. Highway 80 at Ward Lane in Princeton.

 

Bossier Parish investigators continue to encourage anyone with information about Nelson to step forward by calling the sheriff’s office at (318) 965-2203 or Bossier Crime Stoppers at (318) 424-4100.

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